Friday, July 08, 2011

Boat Speed

Post: Boat Speed
From > http://davidcalder.ca/

Dave Calder & Scott Frandsen Canadian Pair now and in 2008

Just found this great post Dave made back in 2009. I agree with all he has described and actually think the carry over of comments about how their pair rowed to be somewhat lacking understanding. Here is my two bobs worth...

We worked boat speed as did they. Simple.

How they made it look was different but only as he mentions here that they had different body types.

My respect for them came before 2008 as I had rowed against both of them at different times in my career. First against Dave in 1999 if I remember correctly. First against Scott in 2003. Both these were in pairs and Dave was fresh out of juniors in 1999 if as I remember being told about this young Canadian kid back then. Scott strokes the pair in 2003 in Milan and was in the final. Watch the race and from the front to the back of the field it was 2 boat lengths for the first 1000m. I know they have been in different boats and had success. What they did in Lucern in 08 and obviously the Games was fantastic. We knew they were fast and that the way they rowed with maximising boat speed in mind and keeping the tempo up due to the style that suited them that they didn't slow down. I loved this and after the two years of racing the wonderfully competitive New Zealand pair, Bridgewater and Twaddle it was a cool surprise when they showed there form in Lucern.

Boat Speed is all that matters. How you get it is about learning what works for the individual and crew. Simple really.


2 comments:

Eric said...

oh man.. you could right a book on the different ways to achieve bot speed. So many variables, so many techniques, so many different set-ups..

Scotty said...

I wonder if it's more that the variables lie in the infinite complexities of combining athletes as individuals into a single, perfectly harmonious movement... And that we get too bogged down thinking we should row like 'x' crew or technique to go fast, rather than starting with identifying the 'simple' as Drew and Dave say and then asking ourselves 'how do we combine to generate that simplicity?' just a thought.

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